Kea crowned Bird of the YearKea crowned Bird of the Year

Kea bird is the endangered, endemic parrot species in New Zealand. Further, it also considers one of the most intelligent birds in the world because the Kea bird has a unique problem-solving ability. It is a large, olive-green parrot with strong flying ability. It also has scarlet underwings and a slender grey-black bill. Usually, the female bird’s body mass is 20% less than a male bird’s. Key bird has long, high-pitched, loud cry and many quiet contact calls can give.
Kea bird has distributed over about four million hectares in axial ranges of the South Island. Mostly they are in montane forests and adjacent subalpine and alpine zones. They build their homes around native forests, and their hunting habitat also includes native forests, sub-alpine scrub, and herb-fields. Nest basically built-in thick, steep forests and often snow-covered areas. Because they can begin breeding, even there is snow on the ground.
Threats

Key birds are considered a threatened species in New Zealand. Stoats are the main predator of the kea bird. Cats also a major threat to key birds. Even though Possums disturb kea nests and prey on eggs, they aren’t severe as stoats. Key birds are a vulnerable species since they nest in holes in the ground. They can easily find their nests and get in them.
Another main threat to leads is human activities. Areas, where keas feed regularly are at risk from pest control and accidents with man-made objects. Buildings with leads make a threat to these birds since keas attract leads. But leads are poisoning to kea birds.


Food
Kea birds are omnivorous, and they eat a wide range of plant and animal matter. Their foods ranging from fruits, leaves, seeds, and nectar to insect larvae and plant tubers. Some key birds eat carcasses of deer, chamois, and sheep.

Even though these birds consider as parrot types, some behaviors may change from parrots. They are digging for food, ground-nesting, slender bill, and intelligence, prolonged juvenile, and alpine habitat.

Do you know? Why Kiwi lost its wings

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